Local Heroes: Florence Street by KADA

Klopper & Davis Architects have produced one of the most pin-worthy, super-fun, nerd-tastic homes I have ever laid eyes on. Sure, I've shown the money shot below before on our Bricks and Blocks post, but to truly appreciate the creative genius of these guys, you need to see the whole house. I just love it - what do you think?


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick


Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick



Florence St House, Klopper & Davis Architects #kada #architecture #brick

I love how the home has fun elements scattered throughout, in the form of bright sunny pops of colour or embossed brickwork space-invaders. How could you not be happy in this house?

For more information on the Florence St project visit Klopper & Davis Architects.


xo Romona


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Local Heroes: Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects

I am pleasantly surprised with how many exquisite examples I am finding of local residential architecture lately. Here is another such project, Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects. This family home is in Nedlands, in Perth's western suburbs, overlooking the Swan River and utilising a series of interlocking pavilions and linear pergola to traverse its length and lead through the living zones. Simple colour palette and materiality emphasise the clean-lined, contemporary form of this building.


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Complementary materiality of off-white render, stone, timber and zinc cladding}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{How beautiful is that pergola?!}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Classic but contemporary frontage in Nedlands}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Crossing linear elements continue with steel balustrade and stone stairs}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Visual and physical connection between outside and in}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{I love a clean monochrome kitchen. It gives a great base to personalise with homely touches later}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Simple palette and colour scheme continue through into wet areas}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Overlapping linear elements give aesthetic cohesion}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{That ceiling is amazing! I would not have enjoyed drawing up those details, but what a result!}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{A touch of warmth to the monochromatic palette, with timber floor insert}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Sculptural Frangipani trees create organic silhouettes against the linear}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Ceiling and pergola structures linking the pavilion and courtyard spaces}


Gallery House by Craig Steere Architects, Perth. #residential #architecture
{Visually striking linear elements, that would be amazing to take in from the pool, day or night}


I feel the need to point out that while passive solar design principles have been applied with siting, material selection and active tech, the 6 star energy rating achieved is the NCC (National Construction Code) minimum, since this rating system goes up to 10 stars. Just keep this in mind, when designing or building your next home - time spent aiming for a higher rating early on will save you time and money later on.

Regardless of this small point, this house is a beautiful example of contemporary residential architecture and looks like it would be a joy to live in.


xo Romona



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May Lust List

Holy moly, doesn't time shoot by! I've had three different non-primary hair colours since my last post, not that that is saying much for me, but wow. It's been hard to find time between chasing two little devils, designing and building a house and finishing off some projects, but hey, technically, according to surveys and governments, 'I don't work', so what am I complaining about?

I thought I'd do a small post on a couple of designs and products that I am totally lusting after right now. I've been on a self-imposed homewares embargo (mainly so I can have some fun once we are in the new house, and also, like I said, no paid work = no spare mula!) so here are a few things that would be added-to-cart asap in any other circumstance… well, maybe with a lotto win, but one can dream. Or I can just live vicariously through any of you lucky people who happen to purchase up after seeing this.


Cutipol Mezzo cutlery set.
{A Cutipol Mezzo cutlery set}


Elise Raspanti Art Series Kip & Co beanbag.
{An Elise Raspanti Art Series Kip & Co beanbag!}


Blue Heaven LED Neon artwork by Electric Confetti.
{Blue Heaven LED Neon artwork (or any of their ice creams) by Electric Confetti}


Sierra weave Armadillo & Co rug in Pumice.
{Sierra weave Armadillo & Co rug in Pumice has been on my list since I felt it at a trade fair a few years ago. Sooo soft and luxurious!}


Sketch Inc for Lucie Kaas Thief Wall Hook by Urbaani
{Love this Sketch Inc for Lucie Kaas Thief Wall Hook by Urbaani, available at Top3. Becky Kemp's Kokeshi Dolls are also fantastic - check out her insta @sketchinc to see some of her amazing work}


The impressively multi-functional Woodieful chair/table/storage/bucket from new start-up Woodieful in Slovenia.
{The impressively multi-functional Woodieful chair/table/storage/bucket from new start-up Woodieful in Slovenia. I love adaptable 'slashie' furniture! It is available through their Kickstarter campaign here, although you better hurry - only 9 days to go. And yes, they do ship to Australia!}


Dita stools from Grazia & Co, seen here in the stunning Port Phillip Bay penthouse apartment by We Are Huntly. Photo by Brooke Holm.
{These Dita stools from Grazia & Co, seen here in the stunning Port Phillip Bay penthouse apartment by We Are Huntly. Photo by Brooke Holm}


A matte black Anthracite finish Smeg fridge.
{A matte black Anthracite finish Smeg fridge, because why not}


What are you lusting after?

xo Romona


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Local Heroes: Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost

How is it February already?! Well, I'm finally back with a post that I've been slowly adding to and adding to - there seem to always be more angles and images of this celebrated Perth abode - especially that kitchen - which I abso luuurve! Its not a new one, but damn its a goodie.

This stunning multi-material home in Perth suburb of Mosman Park is by the outrageously talented Ariane Prevost. Architect's designing and constructing for themselves (with of course plenty of time, patience, money, attention to detail, great trades and an agreeable partner) can result in the most amazing homes! Her abstract use of seemingly mundane materials comes together in an exciting collection of interweaving spaces. And how great is that kitchen?! A simple palette of colours taken from the raw materials and textures of the building, layered with artwork and those amazing Marimekko fabric covered soft furnishings. These fabrics and patterns inspired the enveloping cor-ten screens that give the house its name.


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Cor-ten Marimekko-inspired cut screens to the front facade allowing privacy to this open-planned home. Image by Heather Robbins of Red Images Fine Photography via House Nerd (an awesome Perth blog you should also check out!)}


#Kitchen. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Brick herringbone floors throughout internal spaces allow seamless blending to exterior zones. Image by Angelita Bonetti}


#Kitchen. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{That stunningly detailed monochrome kitchen! Image by Red Images}


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Creative use of typically common materials adds interest and worth beyond the actual costs}


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Love that monochrome, tetrus-like joinery patterning. Working closely with cabinet makers and joiners resulting in stunning outcomes}


Entry. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Massive front door with handle made from a piece of old bridge timber. Image by Red Images}


Interior. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{That monochrome Marimekko fabric! Image by Red Images}


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Open facade and spaces blurs the line between inside and out. Image by Bo Wong}


Rooftop Terrace. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Landscaped roof terrace with screens from reclaimed roofing timbers}


Rooftop terrace. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Deciduous grape-vine pergolas for summer shade allowing winter sun penetration}


Rooftop. Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Roof terrace at a later date, with succulents and vines now fully established and so lush. Image by Red Images}


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Trailing concrete steps through lush succulents. Image by Red Images}


Marimekko House by Ariane Prevost. Perth, Australia. #Architecture
{Blurring the divide between outside and in. Image by Red Images}



It must be amazing to live in such an open and flowing home, although I must admit that my severely-mosquito-attracting skin does shudder just a little. Might just have to plant a little extra Lavender, Spearmint and Lemongrass around.

Hope you enjoyed!


xo Romona


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Merry Christmas 2015!

merry christmas 2015 from RSD Blog!
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Local Heroes: Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects

Lake house by Jonathan Lake Architects makes use of a steep, compact rear block in inner-city North Perth. Taking shape as a light-weight timber box suspended on a bold rammed-concrete box, the home comprises of public living spaces below with the private spaces above. Working with the tight three hundred square metre block, principles of small house design are utilised to create generous-feeling spaces that belie the 170m² floor area. Open planned rooms with integrated laundry and cabinetry, as well as ample natural light provided by the large, full-height northern doors and windows to the light-filled courtyard make this house a flexible family home.


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. To the street, Lake House takes the form of a timber box elevated on the bold box of rammed-concrete walls. #Architecture #Perth
{To the street, Lake House takes the form of a timber box elevated on the bold box of rammed-concrete. LVL fins provided added privacy as well as character}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. Structural rammed concrete walls are revealed as a raw, textural backdrop for kitchen and living spaces. #Architecture #Perth #Interiors
{Structural rammed concrete walls are left revealed as a raw, textural backdrop for kitchen and living spaces. Ply wrapped cabinetry adds warmth and the appearance of integrated furniture}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. The compact living space extends into the adjacent north-facing courtyard for indoor/outdoor entertaining. Loving all those honest materials and textures! Artwork: Shirley Purdie, Nnideudia, 1994. #Architecture #Perth
{The compact living space extends into the adjacent north-facing courtyard for indoor/outdoor entertaining. Loving all those honest materials and textures! Artwork: Shirley Purdie, Nnideudia, 1994}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. Colour-filled perforations in the plywood screens act as both an artwork and visual privacy, sun-shading and temperature control. #Architecture #Perth
{Colour-filled perforations in the plywood screens act as both an artwork and visual privacy, sun-shading and temperature control}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. Sunlight passing through the plywood screens, which feature a pattern created by artist Pamela Gaunt, casts vibrant patterns across the concrete floors and white walls. Screens are CNC routed with pebble-shaped penetrations filled with coloured acrylic. #Architecture #Perth
{Sunlight passing through the plywood screens, which feature a pattern created by artist Pamela Gaunt, casts vibrant patterns across the concrete floors and white walls. Screens are CNC routed with pebble-shaped penetrations filled with coloured acrylic}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. Instead of wasting valuable site space with driveways and garage, circulation spaces are edged with lush native and subtropical planting. #Architecture #Perth
{Instead of wasting valuable site space with driveways and garage, circulation spaces are edged with lush native and subtropical planting}


Lake House by Jonathan Lake Architects, North Perth. #Architecture #Plans and #Sections
{Lake House documentation by Jonathan Lake Architects. Image source}


For more information on this project, visit Jonathan Lake Architects. Images by Robert Frith.

xo Romona


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Local Heroes: Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal Architecture

Time for another local project, this time in Fremantle. This modern addition to the 1890's duplex seeks to improve the relationship between existing house and external garden space with it's flexible outdoor room. That flexibility is perhaps best seen in the transitional adaptability of the numerous folding openings to the rear addition's north and west facing facades. These allow the occupants to adjust the permeability of the building envelope depending on weather, season, comfort and the desired level of intimacy.


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Loving those brick steps taking their time meandering up to the new level}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Open-wide. Come inside}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Who doesn't want a naked room like this, kept simple with a burgundy Persian and two chatting Eames birds}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Open to reveal the internal glow}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Closed to weather, allowing privacy and comfort as required}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Filtered light and screened privacy without feeling boxed in}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Open room with custom in-built joinery for storage and seating}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.
{Exploded axonometric of addition}


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.


Bellevue Terrace by Philip Stejskal. Fremantle addition to 1890s home.


All images are from Philip Stejskal Architecture with Photography by Bo Wong.

Share your thoughts? Can you picture living in a space like this?

xo Romona


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Modern House at Big Hill


House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects, near Victoria's Great Ocean Road, is characterised by a strong, triangular form and a restrained, honest material palette. Semi-recessed into the site, the home opens up to take advantage of the surrounding coastal and bush views. I love the simplicity of the smooth natural grey concrete block walls and concrete floor, with the subtle warmth of the plywood accents for storage and partitions. The black ceilings allow them to disappear and push the viewer through the walled space to the spectacular views beyond. Although definitely robust in form, this form creates intimate spaces where light and shadow, cool and warm, smooth and textured complement rather than compete.


The dark roof form helps blend the house into the bush landscape. Exterior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{The dark roof form helps blend the house into the bush landscape}


Contrasting smooth cool concrete floors and natural grey block walls with warm continuous blackbutt plywood Armourpanel surfaces by Big River. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Contrasting smooth cool concrete floors and natural grey block walls with warm continuous blackbutt plywood Armourpanel surfaces by Big River}


Interior. Concrete and Plywood. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Dark picture frame windows are recessed to create deep plywood window seats for soaking up the surrounds}


Bedroom Interior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Bedroom with Armourpanel plywood storage doubling as deep window seat}


Kitchen Interior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Open kitchen kept simple with concrete and dark timbers}


Interior Views. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Space furniture in this living space retains the view as the hero}


Concrete Interior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Opening to the bush beyond}


Concrete Interior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Insitu concrete step doubles as seat and storage}


Interior Living Dining. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Custom plywood joinery doubles as seating and storage, minimising need for additional furniture}


Interior Living. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Smooth concrete floors flow to outdoor spaces}


Exterior. House at Big Hill by Kerstin Thompson Architects. Australian Architecture.
{Robust form to lower terrain}


Images courtesy of Kerstin Thompson Architects and photographed by Trevor Mein.


xo Romona


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Local Heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects

I recently had a chat with an architect who stated that "there are no good examples of residential architecture in Australia". Sure, I'm paraphrasing and it may be a little out of context, but his statement had me baffled and determined to show any others out there who may have had similar thoughts how wrong they are. I guess in the context of multi-million dollar houses, there may be few architectural standouts, however, I think some of the most beautiful projects that Australian Architects have produced (especially in the last few years) are brilliant examples of restraint in materiality and scale, something sorely lacking in today's consumerist, resource-shrinking society.

But I digress, this isn't a lecture on residential sustainability, rather the exploration of something beautiful born out of perceived limitations. Triangle House on a tight 180m2 triangular block in Mt Lawley, Perth showcases the ingenuity of Robeson Architects and to me is one example of Perth architecture at an international standard. What better way to start this series than with a project that initially grabbed me on Pinterest, but really had me hooked when I found out it was not only Australian, but super-local (Mt Lawley!) and a fellow female architect. Enjoy!


The stunning triangular form juts out with supercool artwork below at street level by Robert Jenkins. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{The stunning triangular form juts out with supercool artwork below at street level by Robert Jenkins (@theblackmountains). So recognisable to me now that we have a wall of his around the corner in Bassendean, and you may have seen me go a little insta-happy over}


Monochrome Living Room Kitchen. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{This was one of the first images that made me fall for the place. Of course those who know me, know my tendency towards black, white and grey, but it also has all my other loves - big white kitchen, contrasting black frames, deep polished concrete flooring, minimal timber accents, big snuggly Jardan grey wool couch, indoor potted sculptural Dracaena, statement linear ceiling lighting, even the furry throw - my god Simone, you can do no wrong in my eyes! In fact, if I plonked my gorgeous tan fur-baby on that rug, the picture would be complete}


Monochrome Kitchen. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Brutal black kitchen island wrapped in electric-veined Nero Marquita marble adds drama to the monochromatic space}


Monochrome kitchen. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Just a beautiful kitchen in blocked monochrome, and I love that massive projected north-facing window, done in one-way glass boxed out in steel for privacy}


Monochrome Interiors. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Extending the black-framed picture window to the heavens with a waterfall skylight}


Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Sharp-edged deck space making the most of a difficult site and adding a bit of drama to Vincent Street}


Living. Concrete floors. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Clean gallery feel to the downstairs office softened by multiple but complementary textures and material finishes, like the burnished concrete floor, blackened LVL stair treads and black steel}


Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Simple but inspiring void spaces and linear movement}


Bathroom. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Clean and minimal bathroom in continuous matt charcoal tile with clever hidden storage. Love the concrete bathroom floor, but I'm unable to convince my husband that I won't snap my other leg if we have that}


Bathroom. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{You know it's good when even the dunny makes you go Oooo}


Wall mural by Robert Jenkins. Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Detail of the cool mural work at Vincent street level by Robert Jenkins}


Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Image by Dion Photography}


Local heroes: Triangle House by Robeson Architects. Image by Dion Photography. Vincent St, Mt. Lawley. Perth Residential Architecture.
{Image by Dion Photography}


All images are from Robeson Architects (big thanks Simone) and Dion Photography. If my house turns out even half as nice, I'll be wanting some shots done by those guys. Simply brilliant!

Doesn't it make you proud to have some lovely architecture in Perth (and Australia)? What are your thoughts on this place?

I'm hoping to showcase a bunch of other local talented architects and their projects soon, so feel free to let me know if there are any that stand out to you.

Hope you enjoyed!


xo Romona


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Finding the Perfect Cheese Board

Having recently acquired (and by that I mean impulsively handing over my credit card and purchasing things I really shouldn’t be getting at least until our new house is built and paid for!) some gorgeous Cutipol cutlery including their sexy cheese knife, I have been umm-ing and ahh-ing over the best serving platter to use them with. Do I go cheap, do I go spensy, quality or trendy, do I wait for my kitchen to be a resolved design, or heaven forbid, actually built?!

Anyway, to hopefully help me in this (first-world problems) decision making, I thought I’d share a few I’ve found and hope that someone comments and sways my mind in the right direction. Here goes...


Barton Marble Rectangular Board by Country Road. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Barton Marble Rectangular Board by Country Road}


Square porcelain chopping block by Slab and Slub. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Square porcelain chopping block by Slab and Slub}


Slate cheese board by West Elm. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Slate cheese board by West Elm}


Cheese Paddle No. 9 by Sands Made in Melbourne. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Cheese Paddle No. 9 by Sands Made in Melbourne}


Olive Wood Rustic Cutting Board at West Elm. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Olive Wood Rustic Cutting Board at West Elm}


Colour Platter by Karimoku New Standard available at Stylecraft. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Colour Platter by Karimoku New Standard available at Stylecraft}


Barton Long Board in Oak by Country Road. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Barton Long Board in Oak by Country Road}


Hello Cheesy Boards - I love their burnt pun-tacular boards from their etsy store. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Cheesy Boards Hello - I love their burnt pun-tacular boards from their etsy store}


Monaco Cheesy Cheese Slate board by Boska at Peter’s of Kensington. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Monaco Cheesy Cheese Slate board by Boska at Peter’s of Kensington}


Coorabel chopping board by Eco Chopping Boards in Byron Bay from local Camphor Laurel timber. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Coorabel chopping board by Eco Chopping Boards in Byron Bay from local Camphor Laurel timber} 


Kitchen Board No. 1 by Sands Made. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Kitchen Board No. 1 by Sands Made}


Smooth flat porcelain serving plate in the Life range from Target - only 10 bucks!. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.
{Even considering just getting this smooth flat porcelain serving plate in the Life range from Target - only 10 bucks!}


PS. here are my Goa range Cutipols Happy

Cutipol Goa cutlery. Finding the Perfect Cheese Board.



What do you think?

xo Romona


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Spotlight on Australian Designers | Anaesthetic

Man, it has been a while since I highlighted some of the great talent that we cultivate here in Oz. I blame it on a combination of laziness, distance from trade events (Poor Perth!) and time running a million k's an hour away from me.

So once again, my spotlight shines brightly on a successful lighting design company. The talented
duo of Ben and Kiri Wahrlich (actually Kiwi's but that has never stopped us claiming people before), can't be labelled 'emerging' talent any more - they are definitely design fixtures (pardon the pun) with their beautiful range of lighting, furniture and homewares products as Anaesthetic. My own home (currently in planning stage - I dropped the plans off this morning and now am holding my breath for limited council changes) sported several of their lighting products in different stages of concept, from the kitchen to the entry to the dining room. I've shown both their Hide leather pendants and Kasa concrete homewares work here before, here and here back in 2013 & 2014. My current faves however are their Constellation pendants - I'd love to have the Southern Cross above my head as I enter home or sit down to dinner in a darkened room.

I could go on about their design and engineering credentials, their accolades and their awards, but I think their products are best to soak up visually. Hopefully the photos suffice, for now.


Constellation Lights 'Southern Cross' by Anaesthetic in beautiful polished brass.
{Constellation Lights 'Southern Cross' by Anaesthetic in beautiful polished brass}


Constellation Lights by Anaesthetic in luxurious polished brass.
{Constellation Lights by Anaesthetic in luxurious polished brass}


Bezel pendant lights by Anaesthetic with its spun aluminium powder-coated top with piano-inspired polished brass 'bezel'
{Bezel pendant lights by Anaesthetic with its spun aluminium powder-coated top with piano-inspired polished brass 'bezel'}


Bezel pendant light by Anaesthetic with its spun aluminium top powder-coated white with piano-inspired polished aluminium 'bezel'.
{Bezel pendant light by Anaesthetic with its spun aluminium top powder-coated white with piano-inspired polished aluminium 'bezel'}


Bala pendant light by Anaesthetic in black.
{Bala pendant light by Anaesthetic in black}


Bala pendant light by Anaesthetic in precision machined polished brass.
{Bala pendant light by Anaesthetic in precision machined polished brass}


Hide pendant lights by Anaesthetic with individually cut leather shades.
{Hide pendant lights by Anaesthetic with individually cut leather shades}


Mariner stools by Anaesthetic made from American White Oak with navy or white braided rope foot rests sourced from sailing yachts, hence the name.
{Mariner stools by Anaesthetic made from American White Oak with navy or white braided rope foot rests sourced from sailing yachts, hence the name}


Jack concrete bluetooth speaker by Anaesthetic.
{Jack concrete bluetooth speaker}


Totem stackable stools from recyclable LPDE.
{Totem stackable stools from recyclable LPDE}


Anaesthetic will be exhibiting at the Sydney Indesign event from August 13-15, so get along to soak up some of the talent. Wish I could be there!

xo Romona


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Interior Design Solutions that will Enhance your Life

Sponsored post by Gail Newland.

It’s all too easy to get stuck in a design rut when it comes to your home. However, with a little creative thinking, it’s possible to revamp your property. The following simple but effective design tips could help you to improve your house and they might even enhance your life.

Window dressings that put you in control


If you assume window dressings are just there to look pretty and give you some added privacy, think again. By choosing these home accessories carefully, you can bring added comfort to your rooms. For example, it’s now possible to purchase stylish and highly practical blockout blinds and curtains. Available from window dressing specialists like Curtainworld, these accessories give you complete control over light levels in your home. Whether you want total darkness to help you sink into peaceful slumber or you’re keen to create the movie-theatre experience in your lounge, these blinds and curtains can help.

Chambers Street Residence in South Yarra, Melbourne by MIM Design. #rug #interiors #curtain #bright
{Chambers Street Residence in South Yarra, Melbourne by MIM Design}

Soft furnishings that exude style and bring added comfort


Another quick and easy way to refresh the look and feel of your property is to add some new soft furnishings. While a simple rug and a few cushions may not seem much when you consider them on their own, when you adorn your rooms with an array of lavish new accessories, they can have a transformative impact. Thick pile rugs for your floors, soft throws for your seats and a scattering of stylish cushions on your couch and bed can really bring your rooms to life.

Appartement Lyon 5 By Maison HAND in Elle Decoration. Photo by Romain Ricard. #shag #pile #rug  #curtain #dark #interior
{I'd love to cosy up in this place right now! Appartement Lyon 5 By Maison HAND in Elle Decoration. Photo by Romain Ricard}

Bring the outside in


Another simple and satisfying way to enhance your home is to bring the outside in. Most people have at least a scattering of small pot plants in their properties, but why not take this a step further and introduce big, bold plants that make a real style statement? From the Zanzibar gem to the golden cane palm and Madagascar dragon tree, there’s certainly no shortage of options to choose from. This greenery can be used to liven up otherwise bare corners, soften stark walls and generally add a jungle look to your rooms.

Jazmina's Melbourne bathroom. #plant #bath #rug
{Jazmina's beautiful Melbourne bathroom featured in The Room Illuminated}

As well as improving the appearance of your home, plants may help to boost your health. According to research conducted by Professor Margaret Burchett and Dr Fraser Torpy from the University of Technology Sydney, indoor greenery can remove pollutants, cleanse stale air and reduce symptoms such as sore eyes and headaches. The scientists also suggest that plants can help to minimise feelings of stress and fatigue. The best thing is, you don’t have to splash much cash to get your hands on these home accessories and, as long as you care for them properly, they’ll give you many years of enjoyment.


I hope you all enjoyed these few tips from our contributor Gail Newland. I personally love seeing plants of all sizes inside. Thanks Gail!
Do you have any tips of your own to share?


xo Romona


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The Dark Side

I've been obsessing over wonderfully moody interiors lately. Perhaps it is knowing that most of my new house will most likely be quite white (Lexicon quarter or half at most!), that I am dreaming of one room being the complete opposite. The most likely candidate is the lounge / media / music room, that would benefit from being an insulated, cushioning and introspective space. I'm picturing luxurious, light-absorbing velvets and the dull glow of warm lighting on black walls and ceilings. Splashes of dark teal, petroleum and peacock mixed with jewel tones of perhaps emerald, amethyst and ruby. Multiple textures will be key to keeping the space warm and inviting rather than claustrophobic and threatening.

Here are a few interiors that are exploring and expressing their dark side.


Graham Atkins-Hughes' family home in London, styled by wife Jo Atkins-Hughes. #dark #interiors
{Graham Atkins-Hughes' family home in London, styled by wife Jo Atkins-Hughes. Graham also photographs a lot of Abigail Ahern projects, and I can definitely see a similar taste and influence there. Image from Milk Magazine}


Graham Atkins-Hughes' family home in London, styled by wife Jo Atkins-Hughes. #dark #loungeroom #interiors
{From the same home as above, this dark panelled lounge exudes a moody confidence. 'Photographed by Graham Atkins-Hughes and styled by Jo Atkins-Hughes}


scheme by Texture Design for Godfrey Hirst flooring. #dark #interiors
{Not quite as dark, but still strong, this scheme by Texture Design for Godfrey Hirst flooring campaign shows beautiful combinations of dark block colours and textures}


circa-1880s home in Armadale, Melbourne features dark walls with black panelling, taking this extravagant character home to a new level. #dark #interiors
{This circa-1880s home in Armadale, Melbourne features dark walls with black panelling, taking this extravagant character home to a new level}


Styling for the 2015 Dulux Colour Forecast 'Wildland' colours. Loving that deep sea blue wall. #dark #interiors
{Styling for the 2015 Dulux Colour Forecast 'Wildland' colours. Loving that deep sea blue wall}


Dark, moody interiors by the ever-impressive queen of dark interiors Abigail Ahern
{Dark, moody interiors by the ever-impressive queen of dark interiors Abigail Ahern}


Dark bedroom in shades of grey. Photo by Romain Ricard. #dark #interiors
{Dark bedroom in shades of grey. Photo by Romain Ricard}


Dark walls with black window frames allow the natural light and view to green foliage beyond to shine, not to mention the beautiful Lindsey Adelman #pendant. #dark #interiors
{Dark walls with black window frames allow the natural light and view to green foliage beyond to shine, not to mention the beautiful Lindsey Adelman pendant}



What do you think about dark interiors, especially in the Australian setting?
Would you or have you used dark interiors in your home?


xo Romona


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Good Kitchen Design: How to make the most of your space

Sponsored post by The Kitchen Place.

Your kitchen should be designed to work in sync with your lifestyle, yet too often it is the opposite way around. As home design continues to revolutionise itself the modern kitchen is a world away from its past incarnations. Previously seen as a room of preparation and storage, the modern kitchen is open, inviting and acts as the epicentre of the home, truly the heart of the modern family unit. This rise in status has resulted in an increased desire for a kitchen that reflects upon the household, effective and efficient. Check out these newest kitchen design rules to mould your own classic, modern kitchen.

Establish your Design Reasoning


The first and most important design rule is to decide what motivation you have for your kitchen. This can be divided into three broad categories; Functionality - If your kitchen has inadequate bench, storage or stove space you may be inclined to re-design. Style - If you're looking to update your kitchen with modern cabinetry, appliances or colour schemes. Value - If you're looking to add additional value to your home for re-sale value. Without establishing your design motivation you'll end up with a scattered and poorly functional kitchen.

Good Kitchen Design - How to make the most of your space.

Start with the Kitchen Triangle


The Kitchen Triangle, or 'work triangle' as defined by the National Kitchen and Bath association, is an imaginary line drawn between the three vital work stations of your kitchen. The sink, oven top and fridge. You should be able to easily transition to each centre without the space being cluttered or too far apart (not more than three metres between each point).

Aesthetics


If the Kitchen Triangle is a symbol of an efficient kitchen, your surfaces, cabinetry and appliances will represent the style. Try to maintain streamlined surfaces, cabinets should reach the ceiling or run flush with a bulkhead. This limits wasted space which impairs your design with inefficiency, as well as preventing a recess for catching dust. Consider integrating appliances within the design through the use of integrated front panels. This technique can blend a dishwasher into the overall style of your kitchen seamlessly.

Good Kitchen Design - How to make the most of your space.

Lighting and Colour


Lighting and colour are also key components of strong kitchen design. Be aware that colours may dictate mood in certain homes. Neutral palates are thought to create calm while using bright, bold colours on splashbacks can create a more direct aesthetic. When it comes to lighting, consider using energy efficient LED’s or compact fluorescents in work spaces. Adding dimming switches or floor lights can also be used to create mood and atmosphere at your discretion.

Designing your ultimate kitchen, a room which is both effective and efficient while retaining a warmth, joy and connection, is a massive undertaking. As the centre of your families health and wellbeing there are a range of factors from design, to mathematical and aesthetic, which will dictate your finished product. Consider the needs of your family and your home and with these hints and tips you’ve taken the first step towards your perfect, designer kitchen.


I hope you found these kitchen design tips useful. Let me know what you think Happy

xo Romona

* All images from The Kitchen Place.


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Australian Interior Design Awards 2015 - Residential Award

Just thought I'd share some of the beautiful images of this year's winner of the Residential Design category of the DIA Australian Interior Design Awards 2015. How gorgeous is this reno/extension of Orama house by Smart Design Studio in Sydney?!


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category. Serge Mouille lamp
{This dining room is composed of the perfect balance of bright white, raw concrete and moody black accents. Although these Serge Mouille lamps seem to be everywhere at the moment, you can't deny that they have a massive impact with their insectoid arms reaching into the space as few other lighting forms can}


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category.
{Modern luxe with heritage charm in the bathroom. Marble with burnished brass, shadowed iron and bright white}


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category. Black AJ table lamp.
{In love with this black-edged panel diving wall - the perfect simple, graphic bedhead. Not to mention that black AJ table lamp, always on the top of my bedside/office table lamp wish-list!}


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category.
{Dark and moody ensuite, a perfect retreat}


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category.
{Gilded patina underfoot and overhead pick up warm elements in the artwork, acting as a respite from other cool spaces in the home}


Orama house by Smart Design Studio, Sydney. Winner of 2015 Australian #Interior #Design Awards, #Residential Category. Serge Mouille floor lamp.
{I love the beautiful blank canvas of monochromatic materials and textures, allowing a stunning collection of artwork to stand out, with classic modern furniture and lighting}


Images by
Sharrin Rees.


xo Romona


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